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Abstract

A STUDY OF KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES OF PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS AND THE PUBLIC COMMUNITY REGARDING ANTIBIOTICS PRESCRIPTION AND USE IN KHARTOUM STATE IN 2015

*Ahmed Kamal Abdalgadir Mohamed, MBBS and Professor Abdalla Omer Elkhawad

ABSTRACT

Background: Knowledge attitudes and practices of doctors and the public community regarding antibiotic use and prescription is a major problem that might contribute to increase in infections resistant to antibiotics and spread of antibiotic misuse. Objectives: General Objective: To assess knowledge attitudes and practices of primary care physicians and public community regarding antibiotic prescription and use in Khartoum State. Specific Objectives: 1) Knowledge of primary care physicians about counseling patients regarding inappropriate use of antibiotics. 2) Factors affecting Primary care physician prescription of antibiotics. 3) Knowledge of public community about antibiotic resistance. 4) Factors affecting public community treatment seeking behaviors and satisfaction towards antibiotic use. Research methodology: In this descriptive hospital and population based study Knowledge attitudes and practices of both doctors and patients were assessed, 200 participant (100 doctor and 100 participant from public community) and a standardized questionnaire was given to be filled. Findings and conclusion: results were variable showing in the public community different knowledge about antibiotics (54% of population knew antibiotics) but 62% used it over the counter without prescription and only 27% finished the antibiotic course. 84% knew there are good and bad bacteria and only 65% understood that antibiotic misuse may kill good bacteria. 26% of public community used left over antibiotics in case of fever. Only 9% said antibiotic misuse affect economic status of the country. Regarding doctors: 72% prescribe antibiotics without culture and sensitivity, 79% of them counsel patients about antibiotic misuse although surprisingly 50% of them use over the counter antibiotics in case of upper respiratory tract infections. 27% of doctors mentioned that pharmaceutical companies affect their prescription practice and 57% prescribe according to their personal experience although 88% stated they have standard treatment guidelines in their hospitals. 95% of doctors said that antibiotic misuse affect economic status of the country and 96% suggested training of doctors and education of patients as a solution to antibiotic misuse. Recommendation: 1) Counseling of patients about antibiotic misuse. 2) Education of doctors to follow standard treatment guidelines. 3) Multidisciplinary approach in treatment of infection (involving laboratory, pharmacists and doctors). 4) Restriction of over the counter antibiotics in pharmacies.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Doctors, Knowledge attitudes and practices, General Population.


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